Charter Day of Lehigh University

150 years ago, on the 9th day of February 1866, the charter of the Lehigh University was approved by Andrew Gregg Curtin, Governor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
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Steve Kreider: The Game Changer

Lehigh University Photograph Collection

Steve Kreider with Outstanding Player Trophy in 1978.

The Lehigh-Lafayette Rivalry Week is upon us again. We were flipping through past issues of the Brown and White, and decided to spotlight a year where Lehigh was victorious over the Leopards (surprise, surprise.) In the 1978 rivalry game, the 113th to be played, Lehigh triumphed, 35-17.
Lehigh trailed Lafayette until the third quarter of the game, but then had a 21-point burst.  Who is especially interesting is the game-changer we found.  His name is Steve Kreider.  He’s cited as a major player in the game.  Upon further research, we discovered that Steve Kreider may just be one of the most well-rounded people alive.
Kreider had a stellar college football career.  He was named an All-American Wide Receiver by the Associated Press in 1977.  That year, he helped the Lehigh Engineers snatch the Division II national championship.  He had 72 catches, 1,567 yards, and 19 touchdowns (we don’t know much about football, but we assume this is all very good). His academics weren’t shabby either- he was a Rhodes Scholar candidate.
Kreider would go onto further success in the National Football League.  After his senior year of college, he was drafted to the Cincinnati Bengals. He served as a wide-receiver for the team for seven years.  He even played in the Super Bowl game against the 49er’s.
He dedicated himself to his studies in his spare time away from football. Though he was an exceptional electrical engineering student at Lehigh, he went on to graduate school for business (a bold jump from engineering).  He studied at the University of Cincinnati and received his MBA and doctorate in finance from there.
Now, what is Steve Kreider up to?  He’s was Chief Investment Officer of Legg Mason Inc.’s Western Asset Management and was hired in 2014 to be Chief Investment Officer of Western & Southern Financial Group Inc.
So, essentially, Steve Kreider may be one of the most impressive people you’ll ever hear about.

Brown and White Vol. 90 no. 23: Kreider eyes his football future: pro career beyond the horizon?
Brown and White Vol. 91 no. 17: Ex-QB Kreider makes it big
“Ex-Bengal Kreider to Run Western & Southern’s $46 Billion” on Bloomberg

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Armistice Day

Now known as the Veterans Day, “Armistice Day” was declared as a national holiday by President Woodrow Wilson to celebrate the end of the Great War on November 11, 1918 (the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month). Members of Lehigh University participated the World War I in many fronts, many lives were lost. To show the appreciation to their services and to honor their memory, Lehigh University dedicated the Alumni Memorial Building to “commemorate the services and sacrifices of Lehigh Alumni and undergraduates” in the World War I.

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Happy Halloween from the Hill!

fraternities-seal-skullHappy Halloween!

From the Epitome 1913, Fraternities greeting the readers with Lehigh Seal decorated with skulls, ghosts and tombstones!

https://archive.org/stream/epitomeyearbook137lehi#page/99/mode/1up

 

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Lehigh Celebrates its Sesquicentennial

Lehigh University is celebrating its Sesquicentennial!  Founded in 1865 by Asa Packer, Lehigh University has been gracing South Mountain now for 150 years.  Asa Packer’s goal for the University was to aid the “intellectual and moral improvement” of the Lehigh Valley (see Sesquicentennial timeline here.)  Its graduates now reach far beyond the Lehigh Valley.  Ten-percent of its current student body is international while it also sends students abroad through the Lee Iacocca internship program and a large number of other global study opportunities.

Lehigh has been reigning in its sesquicentennial with concerts such as the Lehigh Block Party, surprise gourmet dinners for students ala Diner en Blanc, and preparing for the Lehigh-Lafayette rivalry game.  An online countdown was launched to spotlight 150 different important moments at Lehigh in preparation for the anniversary.

A number of academic projects were created, too. There is the digital project “Still Looking For You” where people can contribute photos with written memories that describe historical Bethlehem.  The Leadership Breakfast Program is an opportunity for executives and professionals to meet over breakfast once a month and learn new leadership skills.  Lehigh University is also bringing distinguished lecturers to campus, such as Geoffrey Canada of the Harlem Children’s Zone, whom will be speak about school reform in the United States.

Students are reveling in the festivities on campus!  We have to say, for being 150 years old, Lehigh still looks good!

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First Founder’s Day

From the meeting minutes on the first Founder’s Day Address:
“On motion of Mr. Lamberton it was Resolved, that the thanks of this Board tendered to our President the Rt. Rev. Dr. Howe, Bishop of Central Pennsylvania, for the just, interesting, and eloquent memorial address he delivered this day in honor of our Founder; and that a copy of it is here requested for publication.”

 

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Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes, October 9, 1879

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Founder’s Day Address, 1879

 

 

This publication and so many other important documents from Lehigh’s history are archived, preserved and, in many cases, made available online. Contact Special Collections for more information.

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Redevelopment of Bethlehem

In the mid 1950s, like many metropolitan areas in the United States, the City of Bethlehem was invested in the “urban renewal” projects.
Prepared for the Redevelopment Authority, this 1956 report includes photographs of the neighborhoods and  architectural renderings of the current state of the City and proposed changes.

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Aerial photograph of Bethlehem

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Proposed Bethlehem Center City

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Title page of the 1956 Interim Report

 

“Local History Collections” in Special Collections contains important publications like this 1956 report and many other document to research and study the land use and social, economical and industrial progress on and around the Lehigh University Campuses. Visit Special Collections for more information.

 

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150 Years Ago…

Today, July 27 1865, is the 150th anniversary of the first meeting of the Trustees of Lehigh University. The meeting took place in the Sun Inn, Bethlehem. Lehigh officially opened and the first classes were held on September 1, 1866 but this July 27, 1865 meeting has always been considered the beginning of the University. Read more about this date and other Lehigh stories from the “Countdown to 150”

Here is the portion of the page from the Minutes of Board of the Trustees:

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Board of Trustees Minutes of the July 27 1865 Meeting

 

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Lehigh Music Festival

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In 1948, Lehigh began a new tradition: the Lehigh Music Festival. The festival was well-met, with the first event attracting about 400 attendees. The next year, however, was the biggest festival year with 1100 attendees and plenty of publicity as seen with the billboard pictured above. The 1949 Music Festival was not a sign of years to come, though. The Festival would be cancelled several different times in the years leading up to 1959, but students wouldn’t let the festival go without a fight. There were several Brown and White articles in 1958 advocating for a festival in 1959 after the ’58 festival was cancelled. Meetings were held to judge student interest and the 1959 festival was ultimately planned and executed, but it would be the last of its kind.

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A Lehigh Cyclist

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Around 1890, this stylish Lehigh student was seen on his Velocipede riding around the Campus –Chemical Laboratory (now Chandler-Ullmann Hall) and (possibly) Hydraulics Lab (gone by the early 1900s) are on the background.

That is a bicycle, not a unicycle–look closely and you will see a small second wheel in the back. This type of bike is called a “high wheeler” for fairly obvious reasons. It came about around 1870 and bicycle makers just kept making the front wheels bigger and bigger as they realized that with a larger circumference, the wheel would travel farther with one pedal revolution.

The first American cycling company didn’t come about until 1878, with Columbia Bicycle. The company was based at a sewing machine factory, and each high-sheeled bike cost $125 while a sewing machine cost $13.

This man was likely the focus of much of his classmates’ jealousy with his expensive bicycle, though we’re not sure how he got around efficiently with all of the stairs. He must have broken a sweat riding up the hill, too, but Chandller-Ullman isn’t so high up.

With Lehigh’s Master Plan involving letting even less cars on campus, bicycles may soon be the only option left for students who are always rushing between the buildings. Who knows, though–with Lehigh’s “pedestrian campus,” they might not want cyclists, either.

 

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Sages of the Pages